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 Texas : Towns A-Z / South Texas :

MIRANDO CITY, TEXAS

Webb County, South Texas
Ranch Road 649
30 miles East of Laredo
Population: 493 (2000)

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Mirando City Barber Shop, Texas 1920s
Mirando City Barber Shop
1920's Photo Courtesy Pablo Garcia
Population high point: 1,500 (1929). Mirando City grew from less than 100 residents in 1922 to more than 1,000 by 1925.


History in a Pecan shell


Nicolás Mirando was the town's namesake.
1881: The Texas Mexican Railway laid tracks to the town and a loading platform was built for sheep and cattle.

Peyote
In addition to livestock, the area around Mirando City has grown the peyote cactus. Webb, Zapata, Jim Hogg, and Starr counties contain the only commercial range of peyote cactus in the U.S. "Peyoteros" have harvested peyote for Indians in the United States (for religious ceremonies) for over a hundred years.
Mirando Valley oil field, 1922 Texas
Mirando Valley oil field, 1922
Photo Courtesy Pablo Garcia
Oil
1921: Oliver Winfield Killam brought in the first commercial oil well in the area. Killam, who had already promoted the town of Locust Grove in Oklahoma, bought land in Mirando Valley and started laying out the town of Mirando City in September 1921. Several months later, in December, a gusher at another drilling site ushered in an oil boom. Lots began selling rapidly, and the town quickly became the hub of activity in the oilfield.

1922: A post office was granted.


A short history of Mirando City's water

Mirando City was established without a nearby water supply.

Until the fall of 1922 all of the drinking water for the town was hauled from Bruni at a cost of $13.00 per tank car. In 1922, Wm Sterling and John Long dug wells in the nearby village of Los Ojuelos, which had flowing springs. They then laid a pipeline to Mirando City, built a large storage tank, and installed the town's first water meters. Heavy consumption dropped the water table and the springs dried up. Attempts at deepening the wells worked for a short time, but they dried up in the 1930s.


Electricity

In the fall of 1922 a power plant was built to furnish electricity. It closed after eight months of operation but was bought in 1923 by Richard Young, and put back into use.


Short lives in Mirando City

The Mirando City Bank was only open from June 1922 to May 1923. The Mirando City Record - the town's only newspaper, was first published by Weldon Pharr in June of 1939. The weekly newspaper, although popular, stopped in 1941.

© John Troesser

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Mirando City Forum

My name is Martha Sanchez and I live in Mirando City with my four children and my husband whom was born and raised here in Mirando. I would like to share with your readers my comments towards Mirando. | was born and raised in Laredo and lived in Florida for various years and although I had never been accustomed to small towns, Mirando is a small community that one can come to visit and would want to stay. In one sentence Mirando is like it froze in time. Being raised in Laredo I recall living the way people live in Mirando today. There is a lot of warm hearted, friendly and helpful people in this town. It is great how Laredo has expanded so much but, it is very sad to see so much crime. If any of your readers has time to stop by our small community of Mirando, you are very welcome to, you will see the difference in the friendliness of the people that live and work in this small town.

Greetings from Mirando! - Sincerely, Martha Sanchez, August 11, 2002

Anyone who has photos, stories or memories of Mirando City that they would like to share with our readers - please contact us


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