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Columns | Go Far With Kovar

Finding a Job During COVID

by Taylor Kovar

Hi Taylor - I'm out of work currently because of the virus, but I'm taking this opportunity to live off some savings and find a new career. Any advice on how I can get myself in a good position for a job search starting in the fall? - Ben

Hi Ben
- Sounds like you've got a solid plan, which is always the first step for finding work you enjoy. It's hard to predict what things will look like in a couple months, but you can still use this time wisely to get prepared.

1. Dust off your resume. If you haven't edited your resume in a while, it's definitely time to do so. For starters, you want to have all your most recent work and education on there. Even more importantly, you need to have a resume that reflects our current times. Under each job you've had, there should always be a description of the accomplishments you made and projects you handled. This is a great chance to update that language to reflect useful skills in a remote work environment. Emphasize your responsibility and attention to detail so employers will view you as a safe person to bring on board. We think of everything in terms of the coronavirus these days, so your resume should cater to that.

2. Ask around.
Since it sounds like you're not in a rush with this job search, you should take time to put out feelers. Check in with old connections to see if there's either work available or if anyone knows of a place that's hiring. Do some LinkedIn stalking of people you know whose careers you admire and send some private messages. Ideally, you'll get a job lined up through someone you already know so you don't have to go through the process of submitting an application and being one of a hundred interviewees. If you can avoid being just another face amongst a sea of applicants, you definitely should.

3. Get smarter. Whenever I feel a lull in productivity and I'm not sure what to do next, I download an audiobook about something that interests me. That's more or less how I got into the career I have now - I was interested in and educated myself about money. You don't have to sign up for a course or get a degree in engineering, but you can read books and watch videos and stick useful information in your brain. At some point that information will serve a practical purpose, and it might turn into a career opportunity. The more you know, the more money you can make.

Using this time to research new careers is a great idea, Ben. I'm excited for where you might find yourself in the coming year. Good luck!


Taylor Kovar July 14, 2020
More "Go Far With Kovar"
Legal Disclaimer: Information presented is for educational purposes only and is not an offer or solicitation for the sale or purchase of any specific securities, investments, or investment strategies. Investments involve risk and, unless otherwise stated, are not guaranteed. Be sure to first consult with a qualified financial adviser and/or tax professional before implementing any strategy discussed herein. To submit a question to be answered in this column, please send it via email to Question@GoFarWithKovar.com, or via USPS to Taylor Kovar, 415 S 1st St, Suite 300, Lufkin, TX 75901.



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