TexasEscapes.com HOME Welcome to Texas Escapes
A magazine written by Texas
Custom Search
New   |   Texas Towns   |   Ghost Towns   |   Counties   |   Trips   |   Features   |   Columns   |   Architecture   |   Images   |   Archives   |   Site Map

Counties
Texas Counties


Texas Towns
A - Z





Columns

Columns | Go Far With Kovar

Talking With Friends About Money

by Taylor Kovar

November 29, 2022

Hi Taylor - Any tips for how I can talk about money more comfortably? I find myself not hanging out with friends because I'm trying to cut back on spending, but I hate the idea of my finances hurting relationships. Is there a way to broach the subject?

Hi Charlotte
- Yes! There are many ways to open up this conversation, and it's a shame, so many people feel like money is an untouchable topic. I promise you'll feel better if you talk about your finances with friends. Let's look at a few ways you can get started.

1. Be as honest as possible. The very thing that's keeping you from opening up - the idea that people will know don't have a lot of money - might be exactly what you need to bring up. Almost everyone has their form of financial struggle, making this a universal issue that really won't alienate you in ways you think it might. When you tell people you're trying to spend less and improve your financial situation, they'll probably be sympathetic and might even offer helpful advice. I know it's uncomfortable feeling like the person who doesn't have any money, but people have varying incomes. That's just life, and it's not as big a deal as we make it out to be.

2. Talk in terms of goals.
If you feel uncomfortable because you don't have much, you should find a way to put a positive spin on the conversation. Instead of focusing on not making enough money, talk to people about your savings and retirement goals. When you approach frugality from a place of responsibility, there's no reason to feel ashamed. If you seem excited about the money you're saving and the path you're on, friends and family won't question it. More likely, they'll be happy for you.

3. Ask questions. Sometimes the best way to kick off a difficult conversation is to let another person do the talking. Without being too heavy-handed or invasive, ask your friends if they budget, what their financial goals are if they have an advisor they like working with. If they feel comfortable with the conversation, it will be easy to discuss your personal situation and get on the same page. Best of all, you and your friends can learn from each other. If more people spoke freely about money, people would probably have way fewer financial woes.

I won't lie and say it's easy to start this conversation. Finding your angle takes a little time, but at some point, you just have to rip the band-aid off and start talking. Come at the conversation from a positive place, and you'll definitely feel better after the talk.

Taylor Kovar
TheMoneyCouple.com November 29, 2022 Column

More "Go Far With Kovar" columns


Legal Disclaimer: Information presented is for educational purposes only and is not an offer or solicitation for the sale or purchase of any specific securities, investments, or investment strategies. Investments involve risk and, unless otherwise stated, are not guaranteed. Be sure to first consult with a qualified financial adviser and/or tax professional before implementing any strategy discussed herein. To submit a question to be answered in this column, please send it via email to Question@GoFarWithKovar.com, or via USPS to Taylor Kovar, 415 S 1st St, Suite 300, Lufkin, TX 75901.



 

 

 

 

 


Texas Escapes Online Magazine »   Archive Issues » Home »
TEXAS TOWNS & COUNTIES TEXAS LANDMARKS & IMAGES TEXAS HISTORY & CULTURE TEXAS OUTDOORS MORE
Texas Counties
Texas Towns A-Z
Texas Ghost Towns

TEXAS REGIONS:
Central Texas North
Central Texas South
Texas Gulf Coast
Texas Panhandle
Texas Hill Country
East Texas
South Texas
West Texas

Courthouses
Jails
Churches
Schoolhouses
Bridges
Theaters
Depots
Rooms with a Past
Monuments
Statues

Gas Stations
Post Offices
Museums
Water Towers
Grain Elevators
Cotton Gins
Lodges
Stores
Banks

Vintage Photos
Historic Trees
Cemeteries
Old Neon
Ghost Signs
Signs
Murals
Gargoyles
Pitted Dates
Cornerstones
Then & Now

Columns: History/Opinion
Texas History
Small Town Sagas
Black History
WWII
Texas Centennial
Ghosts
People
Animals
Food
Music
Art

Books
Cotton
Texas Railroads

Texas Trips
Texas Drives
Texas State Parks
Texas Rivers
Texas Lakes
Texas Forts
Texas Trails
Texas Maps
USA
MEXICO
HOTELS

Site Map
About Us
Privacy Statement
Disclaimer
Contributors
Staff
Contact Us

 
Website Content Copyright Texas Escapes LLC. All Rights Reserved