TexasEscapes.com HOME Welcome to Texas Escapes
A magazine written by Texas
Custom Search
New   |   Texas Towns   |   Ghost Towns   |   Counties   |   Trips   |   Features   |   Columns   |   Architecture   |   Images   |   Archives   |   Site Map

Titus
Titus County

Counties
Texas Counties


Texas Towns
A - Z

Mount Pleasant Hotels

Mount Vernon Hotels

More Hotels



 

 


TALCO, TEXAS

"Named after a Candybar"

Titus County, East Texas

3321'44"N 956'15"W (33.362131, -95.104090)

US 271 and Hwy 71
1 Miles E of Franklin County line
16 Miles NW of Mount Pleasant
24 Miles S of Clarksville
36 Miles SE of Paris
Zip Code 75487
Population: 497 Est. (2019)
516 (2010) 570 (2000) 592 (1990)

Book Hotel Here › Mount Pleasant Hotels

Talco TX - Water Tower
Talco Water Tower
Photo courtesy Gerald Massey, August 2010
More Texas Water Towers

History in a Pecan Shell

Although there is not a direct linkage to a previous settlement called Gouldsboro, that town's post office was open by 1856, closed four years later and reopened under a variation (Goolesboro) in 1878. The fledgling community had just 30 people in 1884. It also had a post office with a name that postal authorities deemed confusing (with other Texas post office names). They requested that the townsfolk come up with a new name and it is said that a confection sold by the Texas, Arkansas, and Louisiana Candy Company TAL Co.) was the source.

The Paris and Mount Pleasant Railroad was about to bypass the town but knowing their doom if they stayed put - residents moved their homes and businesses to the tracks beginning in 1912.

By 1914 the relocated Talco had a depot, telephone service and 300 citizens. It entered the great Depression with a respectable 350 people but things changed drastically in 1936. In February of that year the Talco Oilfield came in - creating a boomtown. The town was inundated with jobless men looking for work. Oil leases were sold in the street and even the School trustees accepted a bid for a well to be drilled on the playground of the school.

But the "low gravity" oil was low value compared to the oil in other fields. It was, however excellent for asphalt, and before one could say "Asphalt Capital of the World" - the chamber of commerce was using the slogan. Oil money - or in this case asphalt money - was well spent. Streets were paved, infrastructure put in place and the city incorporated. Bonds were sold so that a new city hall could be built. The population stood at about 2,000 by the end of the 30's, but as the boom subsided - it declined by half.

Talco's population rebounded to 1,250 by 1960, but declined back to 751 by 1980. The Talco field remains in production and the town's economy remains directly linked.

Talco TX - main street
Photo courtesy Gerald Massey, August 2010


Talco Texas - Talco Historical Museum
Talco Historical Museum
Photo courtesy Gerald Massey, August 2010
More Texas Museums


Talco Texas - Talco City Hall cornerstone
Talco City Hall 1937 cornerstone
Photo courtesy Gerald Massey, August 2010
More Texas Cornerstones | Pitted Dates


Talco Texas - Talco High School
Talco High School
Photo courtesy Gerald Massey, August 2010


Talco Texas - Talco High School
Photo courtesy Gerald Massey, August 2010
More Texas Schoolhouses


Talco TX - closed gas station
Photo courtesy Gerald Massey, August 2010
More Texas Gas Stations


Talco TX abandoned building
Photo courtesy Gerald Massey, August 2010


Talco Texas  - Talco Cemetery
Talco Cemetery
Photo courtesy Gerald Massey, August 2010
More Texas Cemeteries


Talco TX City Limit
Talco City Limit
Photo courtesy Gerald Massey, August 2010



See
Recollections of Talco During the Oil Boom
by Robert Cowser



Take a road trip

East Texas
East Texas Sunday Drives

Talco, Texas Nearby Towns:
Mount Pleasant the county seat
Pittsburgh
Clarksville
Mount Vernon
Paris
Texarkana

See Titus County

Book Hotel Here:
Mount Pleasant Hotels | More Hotels

Texas Escapes, in its purpose to preserve historic, endangered and vanishing Texas, asks that anyone wishing to share their local history, stories, landmarks and recent or vintage photos, please contact us.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Texas Escapes Online Magazine »   Archive Issues » Home »
TEXAS TOWNS & COUNTIES TEXAS LANDMARKS & IMAGES TEXAS HISTORY & CULTURE TEXAS OUTDOORS MORE
Texas Counties
Texas Towns A-Z
Texas Ghost Towns

TEXAS REGIONS:
Central Texas North
Central Texas South
Texas Gulf Coast
Texas Panhandle
Texas Hill Country
East Texas
South Texas
West Texas

Courthouses
Jails
Churches
Schoolhouses
Bridges
Theaters
Depots
Rooms with a Past
Monuments
Statues

Gas Stations
Post Offices
Museums
Water Towers
Grain Elevators
Cotton Gins
Lodges
Stores
Banks

Vintage Photos
Historic Trees
Cemeteries
Old Neon
Ghost Signs
Signs
Murals
Gargoyles
Pitted Dates
Cornerstones
Then & Now

Columns: History/Opinion
Texas History
Small Town Sagas
Black History
WWII
Texas Centennial
Ghosts
People
Animals
Food
Music
Art

Books
Cotton
Texas Railroads

Texas Trips
Texas Drives
Texas State Parks
Texas Rivers
Texas Lakes
Texas Forts
Texas Trails
Texas Maps
USA
MEXICO
HOTELS

Site Map
About Us
Privacy Statement
Disclaimer
Contributors
Staff
Contact Us

 
Website Content Copyright Texas Escapes LLC. All Rights Reserved