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BONNEY, TEXAS


Brazoria County, Texas Gulf Coast

2918'40"N 9527'3"W (29.311069, -95.450918)

FM 521, Just west of Highway 288
6 Miles N of Angleton the county seat
30 Miles S of Houston
ZIP code 77515
Area code 979
Population: 372 Est. (2019)
310 (2010) 384 (2000) 339 (1990) 94 (1980)

Bonney, Texas Area Hotels › Angleton Hotels

Bonney Texas city limit
The Village of Bonney city limit sign
Photo courtesy Ken Rudine , July 2007

History in a Pecan Shell

Named to honor a popular conductor of the Columbia Tap Railroad, the town came to life in 1873 when the larger International-Great Northern Railroad assumed operations.

The town's post office opened a year before the first store opened its doors in 1890. Although the town only had a population of 75, a second store opened and a school was organized in the 1890s. Bonney was connected to the world beyond by its own telegrapher and express agent. They discontinued the post office by 1920 but the town survived. In the mid 1950s the population had declined to a mere 25 but by 1988 it was nearing 100. The1990 census reported 339, and for 2000, the figure stood at 384.


Home Site of General Albert Sidney Johnston, Bonney Texas
"Home Site of General Albert Sidney Johnston"
Photo courtesy Ken Rudine , July 2007

Historical Marker Text

Albert Sidney Johnston
(February 2, 1803 -April 6, 1862)

Kentucky native Albert Sidney Johnston graduated from the U. S. Military Academy at West Point in 1826. He was assigned to posts in New York and Missouri, and served in the Black Hawk War in 1832. He resigned his commission in 1834 to return to Kentucky to care for his dying wife.

Johnston came to Texas in July 1836 and enlisted in the Republic army. A month later he was appointed adjutant general, and in January 1837 became senior brigadier general in command of the army. He was appointed secretary of war by President Mirabeau B. Lamar in December 1838.

In 1840 Johnston returned to Kentucky, where he married Eliza Griffin in 1843. They settled at China Grove, Johnston's large plantation at this site, and continued to live here until 1849.

During the Mexican war Johnston commanded a company of Texas volunteers. Later, as a colonel in the U. S. Army, he served on the Texas frontier and in the West. At the outbreak of the Civil War he resigned and was appointed a Confederate general by President Jefferson Davis. Johnston was killed at the Battle of Shiloh in 1862 and was buried in New Orleans. In 1867 he was reinterred in the State Cemetery in Austin.


General Albert Sidney Johnston Historical Marker
General Albert Sidney Johnston Historical Marker on FM 521
Photos courtesy Ken Rudine , July 2007
More People | Texas History


TX Brazoria County 1907 postal  Map
Brazoria County 1907 postal map showing Bonney, N of Angleton, S of Sandy Point and Arcola
From Texas state map #2090
Courtesy Texas General Land Office

Take a road trip

Texas Gulf Coast

Bonney, Texas Nearby Towns:
Angleton the county seat
Houston
See Brazoria County

Book Hotel Here:
Angleton Hotels | Houston Hotels | More Hotels

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