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 Texas : Towns A-Z / Panhandle / West Texas :

LEHMAN, TEXAS

Texas Ghost Town
Cochran County, Texas Panhandle /
West Texas
Hwy 125 & 214
4 Miles S of Morton
55 Miles W of Lubbock
25 Miles W of Levelland
11 Miles W of Whiteface

Population: 0008 (2000)

Lehman, Texas Area Hotels:
Levelland Hotels | Lubbock Hotels

Lehman Tx Collapsing Grain Elevator
Photo courtesy Barclay Gibson, July 2009
See Texas Grain Elevators

History in a Pecan Shell

The town (Cochran County’s first) was built by C. C. Slaughter in anticipation of the railroad’s arrival. The town was originally named after Slaughter’s daughter-in-law’s family name (Ligon). It wasn’t until 1923 when the town was platted.

There have been many county seat rivalries in Texas history, but the fight for the Cochran County seat of government was more personal than most. It was between mega-rancher C.C. Slaughter and his former land agent Morton Smith. Slaughter had the site of Ligon while Smith had founded his own town of Morton, only four miles north.

(See 1940s Cochran County Vintage Map)

Morton won the election held in March of 1923, but it wasn’t as simple as that. Slaughter had the clout to challenge the vote and demand a new election conducted ten months later. Morton was again declared the winner.

When the railroad (the South Plains and Santa Fe) finally arrived, it bypassed both Ligon and Morton. It went four miles south of Ligon – near enough to consider moving the town – which was done. The new town didn’t see the need to honor anyone’s daughter-in-law, so they named it Lehman after one of their own – general manager Frank A. Lehman.

The Ligon school was one of the buildings moved, however it was only used while a larger brick school was constructed.

In the mid 1930s, Lehman only had a few businesses, the school and the post office – and a mere 10 residents. It grew to an estimated 100 by 1940.

In 1945 a federal program called The Lehman Project settled veterans onto subdivided properties that the government had bought. Although the project was deemed a success – it didn’t last. Despite two major investments in a gasoline plant and a sulphur plant, the community declined. An estimated population in the early 1980s was 15 which has since declined to only eight – making Lehman a ghost town, but a populated ghost town.

Lubbock Hotels
Lehman Tx Road Sign
Lehman City Limit
Photo courtesy Barclay Gibson, July 2009
See Texas Signs
Lehman Tx - Closed Scale House
Photo courtesy Barclay Gibson, July 2009
Lehman Tx - Closed Scale House
A Closed Scale House
Photo courtesy Barclay Gibson, July 2009
Lehman Tx - Cotton Scale
Cotton Scale
Photo courtesy Barclay Gibson, July 2009
See Texas Cotton
Lehman Tx Collapsed Building
Collapsed
Photo courtesy Barclay Gibson, July 2009
1940s Cochran County map showing Lehman
(Under "R" in "C-O-C-H-R-A-N")
Courtesy Texas General Land Office
Lehman, Texas
Area Destinations:

Morton
Lubbock
Levelland
Where to Stay:
Lubbock Hotels
Levelland Hotels
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