TexasEscapes.com HOME Welcome to Texas Escapes
A magazine written by Texas
Custom Search
New   |   Texas Towns   |   Ghost Towns   |   Counties   |   Trips   |   Features   |   Columns   |   Architecture   |   Images   |   Archives   |   Site Map

WWII
WWII

Texas History
Texas | Features | World War I

Camp Travis
& The 90th Division

San Antonio, Texas


by John Troesser
Cactus Division, WWI
With the war over - or nearly so -
the troops of the "Cactus Division" had time for photos
Photo Courtesy of the Carl McDonald Collection
The Texas climate has a reputation for unpleasant weather, but mild Texas Winters have provided seasonal homes for baseball clubs, circuses and especially the military. Whether it was U. S. troops in training for war or German Prisoners of War, Texas hosted both groups.

When the United States entered World War I, thirty-two training camps were set up. Half of them were "tent cities" and were for National Guard Units while the other half had wooden barracks for the regular Army.

Camp Travis was situated a few miles from downtown San Antonio adjoining Fort Sam Houston. Originally the name was Camp Wilson, named after the man who "kept us out of war." It was the point from which troops were mobilized in 1916 to quell the Mexican Border Crisis brought upon by the Mexican Revolution.
San Antonio TX - Camp Travis General Staff
Camp Travis General Staff
Postcard courtesy www.rootsweb.com/ %7Etxpstcrd/
San Antonio TX - Camp Travis Light Artillery
Camp Travis Light Artillery
Postcard courtesy www.rootsweb.com/ %7Etxpstcrd/
San Antonio TX - Camp Travis  Squad
Camp Travis Squad
Postcard courtesy www.rootsweb.com/ %7Etxpstcrd/
With the formation of the 90th Division in 1917, it was renamed Camp Travis after William B. Travis of Alamo fame.

Originally the troops of the 90th were to be from Texas and Oklahoma exclusively, but as the men were shipped out, their replacements were from other states. By the time they got orders for Europe in June, 1918, a good percentage of the troops were "foreign."

In August and September of 1918, The 18th "Cactus" Division was formed of the left over units still at the Camp. They were still preparing for the French trenches when the war ended on November 11th. After the war - troops were mustered out through the camp and in 1922 - Camp Travis was absorbed by Fort Sam Houston.
John Troesser
May 2001
We'd like to thank Doyle Phillips for arranging the use of the photograph.

Forum:

Subject: Correction

"My great granduncle served in the 90th Division in WW I until he was KIA 24 OCT 1918. I have spent no small amount of time researching the 90th "Texas Oklahoma Division". I have found an inaccuracy here. It indicates: "One of the Regiments within the 90th was the 19th Infantry." This is not the case.

I checked some of the soldiers' names listed. They were not on the troop transport passenger lists going to Europe with the 90th. The 19th Regiment were garrison troops that never left the US. As indicated here, they were scattered, some of them guarding warehouses and an arsenal in San Antonio, TX.

The 4 Infantry regiments of the 90th Division were 357th, 358th, 359th, and 360th. And they were all draftees except the officers who attended the new officer training school at Leon Springs, TX.

You might also review: Order of Battle of the United States Land Forces in the World War Volume 1: Prepared in the Historical Section, Army War College. Washington, D.C: U.S. Govt. Print. Off, 1931, Facsimile Reprint 1987. digital image
(http://cgsc.contentdm.oclc.org: accessed 25 AUG 2018) http://cgsc.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/ref/collection/p4013coll7/id/853
- John B. Milam, October 03, 2019

More World War I Chronicles

World War II Chronicles
Anyone wishing to share history, stories or photos of their fathers, uncles, grandfathers or great grandfathers that served in WWI, please contact us.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Texas Escapes Online Magazine »   Archive Issues » Home »
TEXAS TOWNS & COUNTIES TEXAS LANDMARKS & IMAGES TEXAS HISTORY & CULTURE TEXAS OUTDOORS MORE
Texas Counties
Texas Towns A-Z
Texas Ghost Towns

TEXAS REGIONS:
Central Texas North
Central Texas South
Texas Gulf Coast
Texas Panhandle
Texas Hill Country
East Texas
South Texas
West Texas

Courthouses
Jails
Churches
Schoolhouses
Bridges
Theaters
Depots
Rooms with a Past
Monuments
Statues

Gas Stations
Post Offices
Museums
Water Towers
Grain Elevators
Cotton Gins
Lodges
Stores
Banks

Vintage Photos
Historic Trees
Cemeteries
Old Neon
Ghost Signs
Signs
Murals
Gargoyles
Pitted Dates
Cornerstones
Then & Now

Columns: History/Opinion
Texas History
Small Town Sagas
Black History
WWII
Texas Centennial
Ghosts
People
Animals
Food
Music
Art

Books
Cotton
Texas Railroads

Texas Trips
Texas Drives
Texas State Parks
Texas Rivers
Texas Lakes
Texas Forts
Texas Trails
Texas Maps
USA
MEXICO
HOTELS

Site Map
About Us
Privacy Statement
Disclaimer
Contributors
Staff
Contact Us

 
Website Content Copyright Texas Escapes LLC. All Rights Reserved