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WWII
WWII

Texas History

World War I Chronicles

The Men
The Camps and Trenches
Home Front
Monuments and Relics

Here are the stories and photos of Texans or Americans who trained in Texas and their involvement in The Great War as it was called. It has become one of the United States neglected wars, even though the casualties exceeded 80,000 killed.

There is hardly a Texas Cemetery without the graves of several Doughboys. The monuments to them are all but invisible. The stance of their statues is more belligerent and active than those erected to the dead of other wars. It's ironic considering the time they spent immobile and dying from disease.

They brought back war trophies from "The War to End All Wars" only to have had them melted down in scrap drives to fuel another World War. In many cases - especially in Texas - there were men fighting their cousins. German immigrants had barely gotten settled here when they were sent to fight their uncle's sons.

WWI - The Men

WWI war hero
  • A War Hero Comes Home by Michael Barr 5-29-18
    Pvt. Francisco Lemos was finally laid to rest in Mountain View Cemetery. He was the first Kerr County soldier to die in World War I, and the last American soldier killed in Europe to be brought home.
  • Louis Jordan - American Hero by Michael Barr
  • The 19th Infantry Regiment & Private Dennis Buchicchio
    They fought the British, Rebels, Indians, Spanish, Mexicans, Philippine Insurgents, Hurricanes, Blizzards, Malaria (and maybe Elliot Ness).
  • Buck Simpson: Cedar Chopping World War One Hero by Mike Cox 11-7-18
    Texas' most heroic warrior, a man whose single-handed exploits rank equal to if not surpassing the famous Sergeant [Alvin] York.


  • The War to End All Wars by Murray Montgomery
    A Gonzales County boy, Courtney C. Buchanan, served with the 36th Infantry Division in World War I and some of the letters that he wrote home to his family and friends were published in The Gonzales Inquirer.

  • Sleeper's Song by Mike Cox
    As a long-time Texas lawyer, Ben Sleeper wrote many a legalese-laden petition alledging this or that in behalf of his clients, but few if any of them ever knew of much less heard the patriotic song he composed as a young Army officer in training back during World War I.

  • Texas War Casualties by John Troesser
    Stone markers and chapels quietly reveal where America gets its soldiers.

  • Private and Corporal York: Lee County Cousins killed in the Great War. Giddings City Cemetery by John Troesser

  • The Gonzales Krupp Cannon by Norman Conquest

  • A Very Brief History of Texas A & M University by Frederick Freshmann

  • Samuel Arthur Robertson by Mike Cox

  • A Soldier's Death Poem by David Knape 11-12-18
  • WWI - The Camps and Trenches

  • Camp Travis by John Troesser
  • Kaiser Cows - Bovine Saboteurs of WWI by Mike Cox

  • LOST PHOTOS OF STARR COUNTY
    The Sgt Roy Chamberlain Collection: Fort Ringgold & Environs c. 1918
    Military Buildings (4 Images)
    Sgt Roy Chamberlain (5 images)

  • Hughes Who in Oil Field by Wanda Orton
    During World War I, Howard Robard Hughes Sr. created a tunneling machine to drill from Allied trenches to German territory

  • Leon Springs' WWI First Officers Training Camp (Camp Funstun) - Historical Marker

  • Everman, Texas (Tarrant County) -
    During WWI, Everman was one of three selected towns to become a training school for pilot training. Both the Canadian Royal Flying Corps and the United States Signal Corps, Aviation Section shared the tiny airfield.
  • WWI - Practicing Trench Fighting in Texas
    Practicing Trench Fighting in Texas
    Postcard courtesy www.rootsweb.com/ %7Etxpstcrd/
    WWI - Home Front
  • Standardized wheel widths kept you in a rut by Delbert Trew
    An article published in the October 2005 Farm Collector Magazine... tells of an early U.S. government directive to all wagon manufacturers. Dated Jan. 1, 1919, the directive stated that, "all wagons must be made to conform to the auto track wheel width of 56 inches."..

  • The War Protest by Bob Bowman
    At the peak of another war ninety years ago, a small East Texas sawmill town made a statement about American soldiers being killed in a distant land.
  • WWI Monuments and Relics
    Otis Henry Memorial.
  • Texarkana - The Otis Henry Memorial
    Rose Hill Cemetery


  • Texarkana - World War I Memorial
  • Crowell
  • Crowell, Texas WWI statues 10-14-18
  • Corinth Baptist Church Cemetery by John Troesser
    WWI Veterans
    Black church and cemetery
    For a tiny cemetery - a disporportionate number of veterans graves.
  • Battleship Texas by Archie P. McDonald (From "All Things Historical")

  • Temple to the Brave, c.1932, Beaumont, Texas by John Troesser

  • Cooke County Courthouse Clock


    Images:
  • Brownsville, Texas WWI Troops Parade
  • Canyon, Texas WWI Monument
  • Celina, Texas War Memorial
  • Fort Bliss 1908
  • Jacksonville, Texas WWI monument
  • Lufkin, Texas Doughboy Statue
  • Paris, Texas WWI Memorial
  • Sinton, Texas Doughboy Statue


    Tombstones:
  • Roger's Cemetery, Austin

  • Ledbetter Cemetery, Fayette County


    General:
  • Memorial Day by Archie P. McDonald
    When Americans pause at the ceremonial beginning of summer to honor those who gave their lives in military service they are participating in our national version of ancient rites...
  • Armistice Day Corsicana TX
    Armistice Day in Corsicana
    Photo courtesy Dianne West Short
    Armistice Day Granger Texas historic photo
    Armistice Day Granger Texas historic photo
    L - Armistice Day Westside of Granger
    R - Armistice Day Eastside of Granger

    Photo courtesy Dan Martinets
    WWI Victory Parade passing the Trinity Galveston's Episcopal Church in 1918
    WWI Victory Parade in Galveston
    Photo courtesy Bill Cherry
    Brownsville TX - WWI Troops Parade
    WWI Troops Parade in Brownsville
    Postcard courtesy www.rootsweb.com/ %7Etxpstcrd/
    El Paso TX - Fort Bliss 1918
    Fort Bliss 1918
    Postcard courtesy www.rootsweb.com/ %7Etxpstcrd/
    Related Topics:
    World War II Chronicles
    Texas Cemeteries
    Statues & Monuments
    People
    Texas Towns
    Texas Escapes, in its purpose to preserve historic, endangered and vanishing Texas, asks that anyone wishing to share history, stories, and vintage/historic photos, please contact us.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


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