TexasEscapes.com HOME Welcome to Texas Escapes
A magazine written by Texas
 
New   |   Texas Towns   |   Ghost Towns   |   Counties   |   Trips   |   Features   |   Columns   |   Architecture   |   Images   |   Archives   |   Site Map

Atascosa County TX
Atascosa County


Texas Towns
A - Z
Pleasanton Hotels

PLEASANTON, TEXAS

Former Atascosa County Seat

Atascosa County, South Texas

28°58'1"N 98°29'6"W (28.966953, -98.484937)
US 281, Hwy 97, FMs 476, 5350, and 1334
5 miles E of Jourdanton the county seat
35 miles S of San Antonio
21 miles SW of Floresville
Population: 10,393 Est. (2016)
8,934 (2010) 8,266 (2000) 7,678 (1990)

Book Hotel Here › Pleasanton Hotels

Pleasanton TX - 1885 Atascosa County Courthouse  old photo

The 1885 Atascosa County Courthouse
October, 1886 photo
courtesy Malcolm Jacob Collection

History in a Pecan Shell

Indian troubles in the late 1850s prompted the establishment of Pleasanton. The town of Amphion (not 100% confirmed to have been the Atascosa county seat) had been formed 9 miles from present-day Pleasanton. Amphion was bypassed by the railroad and is today considered to be a ghost town. John Bowen is credited with naming the community after another settler named John Pleasant. Bowen generously donated five square miles of land to form the new town.

In 1861 the population consisted only of a dozen families and the couthouse was a simple log structure. Nine years later a new courthouse was built and the log courthouse then served as a school. In 1875 the log school was replaced by a stone building. As county seat, Pleasanton had a bright future. At least it was bright up until 1910 when Jourdanton became the county seat.

The Missouri Pacific Railroad connected Pleasanton to San Antonio in 1912 and two years later the town had service to Corpus Christi.

Pleasanton was thriving with a sizeable population of 1,500 and became a collection point for cattle herds traveling north to Kansas.

In the mid 1960s the "Cowboy Homecoming" became an annual event since town promoters considered the city to be "the birthplace of the cowboy." The festival is held each August.

The population of Pleasanton reached over 6,000 in 1980 and over 8,000 in the mid 1990s.

Book Hotel Here › Pleasanton Hotels
Pleasanton TX - Bowyer & Co.  1886 photo

Bowyer & Co., and H. H. Graham's Saddle & Harness Maker
in Pleasanton
October 1886 photo
courtesy Malcolm Jacob Collection
Click on photo for large image

Oil painting of 1885 Atascosa County courthouse moved from Pleasanton Texas to Jourdanton
"An oil painting of the 1885 Atascosa County courthouse that stood in Pleasanton. It has since been demolished. This painting hangs in the Longhorn Museum in Pleasanton." - Terry Jeanson, October 30, 2006

Pleasanton Chronicles:

Cowboy Tree by Mike Cox ( "Texas Tales" Column)

Many a Texas town had its hanging tree, an old oak bearing its ugly legends as well as leaves. But on a more pleasant note, Pleasanton may be the only place in the state – and the world for that matter – that had a cowboy tree.

In a way, it’s natural enough that Pleasanton would have such a tree, unnatural as the combination of the words “cowboy” and “tree” seems to be. The Atascosa County community south of San Antonio has long claimed to be the birthplace of the cowboy.

While proving that the very first Texas cowpoke swung into the saddle in or near Pleasanton would be a bit of a stretch, no one can question that the cattle business and the men who made it happen played an important role in Pleasanton’s past.

An historical marker on the city hall square notes that 43,000 head of Longhorn cattle passed through Pleasanton during the first three months of 1873.

Located on the old El Camino Real at an easy crossing of the Atascosa River, Pleasanton had long been a transportation crossroads. When profit-minded Texans began pushing Longhorns up from the South Texas brush country to the railhead in Kansas in the early 1870s, Pleasanton made a convenient stopping place on what became known as the Chisholm Trail.

The Stock Raiser Association of Western Texas frequently gathered in Pleasanton for its yearly convention, and the Western Stock Journal listed Pleasanton as its place of publication. next page
Atascosa County TX 1940s Map
1940s Atascosa County map showing Pleasanton
East of
Jourdanton, South of San Antonio
Courtesy Texas General Land Office

Take a road trip

Pleasanton, Texas Nearby Towns:
Jourdanton the county seat
San Antonio Bexar County seat
Floresville Wilson County seat
See Atascosa County | South Texas

Book Hotel Here:
Pleasanton Hotels | More Hotels
Texas Escapes, in its purpose to preserve historic, endangered and vanishing Texas, asks that anyone wishing to share their local history, stories, landmarks and vintage/historic photos, please contact us.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Texas Towns A - Z Texas Regions:
Gulf Texas Gulf Coast East East Texas North Central Texas North Central Woutn Central Texas South Panhandle Texas Panhandle
South South Texas Hill Texas Hill Country West West Texas Ghost Texas Ghost Towns counties Texas Counties

Texas Escapes Online Magazine »   Archive Issues » Home »
TEXAS TOWNS & COUNTIES TEXAS LANDMARKS & IMAGES TEXAS HISTORY & CULTURE TEXAS OUTDOORS MORE
Texas Counties
Texas Towns A-Z
Texas Ghost Towns

TEXAS REGIONS:
Central Texas North
Central Texas South
Texas Gulf Coast
Texas Panhandle
Texas Hill Country
East Texas
South Texas
West Texas

Courthouses
Jails
Churches
Schoolhouses
Bridges
Theaters
Depots
Rooms with a Past
Monuments
Statues

Gas Stations
Post Offices
Museums
Water Towers
Grain Elevators
Cotton Gins
Lodges
Stores
Banks

Vintage Photos
Historic Trees
Cemeteries
Old Neon
Ghost Signs
Signs
Murals
Gargoyles
Pitted Dates
Cornerstones
Then & Now

Columns: History/Opinion
Texas History
Small Town Sagas
Black History
WWII
Texas Centennial
Ghosts
People
Animals
Food
Music
Art

Books
Cotton
Texas Railroads

Texas Trips
Texas Drives
Texas State Parks
Texas Rivers
Texas Lakes
Texas Forts
Texas Trails
Texas Maps
USA
MEXICO
HOTELS

Site Map
About Us
Privacy Statement
Disclaimer
Contributors
Staff
Contact Us

 
Website Content Copyright Texas Escapes LLC. All Rights Reserved