TexasEscapes.com 
HOME : : NEW : : TEXAS TOWNS : : GHOST TOWNS : : TEXAS HOTELS : : FEATURES : : COLUMNS : : BUILDINGS : : IMAGES : : ARCHIVE : : SITE MAP
PEOPLE : : PLACES : : THINGS : : HOTELS : : VACATION PACKAGES
Texas Escapes
Online Magazine
Texas Towns by Region
  • Texas Hill Country
  • Central Texas North
  • Central Texas South
  • South Texas
  • East Texas
  • West Texas
  • Texas Panhandle
  • Texas Gulf Coast
    Texas Towns A - Z
    Over 2700 Towns

    Texas Ghost Towns
    Over 700 Ghost Towns

    Book Hotels
  • Texas | Texas Towns | Ghost Towns

    GHOST TOWNS FOR SALE

    Valuable Properties and Invaluable (Free) Advice

    By Brewster Hudspeth
    December 6, 2007
    Recently there have been two authentic Texas ghost towns in the news. Albert, Texas in the Hill Country (just East of Fredericksburg) and The Grove (SW of Waco between Temple and Gatesville).
    Williams Creek School in Albert Texas
    Albert Texas
    Photo courtesy Terry Jeanson, November 2007
    Albert was recently listed on Ebay with a minimum bid of $2 Million for its 28 acres, historic school (a young LBJ taught there) and a still-functioning beer hall. (State roadside signage included.)

    The Grove, Texas old well and cactus
    The Grove
    Photo courtesy David E. Spenser, 2007
    Not a Ghost Town – but a Historic Museum Town

    The Grove comes with a less acreage, but a few more buildings. If you call in the next fifteen minutes, they’ll throw in a huge collection of antiques and artifacts collected since the early 1970s. We were told that whenever a period movie was filming in Texas, and they needed some authentic prop or piece of vintage equipment, they’d often check with The Grove. The hearse from Lonesome Dove is included in the inventory.

    The Grove also functions as a weekend attraction and may be well on the way to becoming the next Luckenbach (not for sale).

    Cornudas Texas city limits
    Cornudas Texas
    Photo courtesy Barclay Gibson, June 2007
    Over the years there have been other Texas towns for sale, notably Cornudas in Hudspeth County (70 miles East of El Paso) and Lajitas which is down on the Rio Grande (90 miles south of Alpine and is just outside the boundaries of the Big Bend National Park). Lajitas is now a sort of fly-in golf course and resort. The irrigated greens make it impossible to miss from the air. The “town” reportedly sold for something like 4.2 million in 2000. After pumping a reported $100,000,000 into the place, it went into foreclosure in 2007 - $18 million in debt.
    Lajitas Texas golf course
    The Lajitas Golf Course
    Photo courtesy Tom Hosier, 2006

    Lobo for sale
    Lobo
    Photo Courtesy Jason Penney
    It can be assumed that the old motel and service station that once made up tiny Lobo, Texas (65 miles NW of Marfa on old US 90) sold for considerably less than Lajitas did. Lobo was bought by a group of Germans.

    Lajitas remains on the state map as does Cornudas and Lobo. Albert and The Grove do not. I think it has to do with how much room the cartographer has to work with.

    Despite the current surge in road trips by Baby-boomers trying to make sense of their childhood memories from behind the windshield of Titanic motor homes, and the popularity of motorcycle clubs, the “Golden Age” of the quaint and curious “roadside attraction” is over.
    Milk Bottle Motel, Uhland, Texas
    Uhland, Texas ( NOT for sale)
    TE photo, October 2007
    TxDOT sells maps which show the traffic counts of almost every road in the state, so before you start entertaining dreams of rattlesnake farms, prairie dog villages or longhorn timeshares, you might want to see how many people actually pass these places. Don’t forget to factor in both increased gas mileage and the incurious younger drivers of today.

    Times have changed, and while movie writers and directors perpetuate the iconic roadside diner – those places are long gone.

    B
    ut for those seeking solitude and a peaceful existence in a place where people have moved on – there are hundreds of towns that (while not being “authentic” ghost towns) remain under-inhabited and would offer a similar lifestyle. They might even provide some amenities – like water, electricity and cranky neighbors.

    When investigating towns like these, one would be wise to check-out the current residents (who might not enthusiastically embrace an increased population). They, like you, may have moved here to get away from people.

    Our suggestion to people with a ghost town / roadside attraction fantasy would be to consult a model train catalog. Then buy a large piece of plywood, order the tiny buildings, paint in the roadways, install the infrastructure and then when the town looks like it’s going to prosper, remove the railroad tracks or bypass it with a new highway.

    It’s how most Texas ghost towns were made.

    © John Troesser

    HOTELS> Traveling Texas?
    Book Your Hotel Here & Save

    Lajitas Update
    or "Things Are Tough All Over
    "

    In a December 8th 2007 San Antonio Express News article entitled Bankrupt Resort Ordered Sold, staff writer John MacCormack wrote of Lajitas, calling it the “ill-fated” resort that “swallowed” $100,000,000.

    The article stated that the resort had been bought in the year 2000 for 4.2 million. The Austin buyer/developer had dreams of turning it into “The Ultimate Hideaway.”

    The developer may have over-estimated the need for such places. These days most people seeking hideaways simply move to countries without an extradition treaty with the United States. The resort (and the 25,000 acres that come with it) had a foreclosure bid of 13.5 million from a single investor. It also reported that the resort is 18 to 20 million dollars in debt.

    A final decision on whether or not the sale proceeds is expected around the New Year.

    Our thanks to Terry Jeanson of San Antonio for this update and to David from Buckholts for the correction. - Ed.

    Related Topics :
    Texas | Texas Towns | Texas Ghost Towns |
    Book Hotel > Book Hotel Here

    Texas Escapes, in its purpose to preserve historic, endangered and vanishing Texas, asks that anyone wishing to share their local history, stories, and vintage/historic photos of their town, please contact us.
    Custom Search
    Book Hotel Here - Expedia Affiliate Network

    CITY SEARCH


    TEXAS ESCAPES CONTENTS
    HOME | TEXAS ESCAPES ONLINE MAGAZINE | HOTELS | SEARCH SITE
    TEXAS TOWN LIST | TEXAS GHOST TOWNS | TEXAS COUNTIES

    Texas Hill Country | East Texas | Central Texas North | Central Texas South | West Texas | Texas Panhandle | South Texas | Texas Gulf Coast
    TRIPS | STATES PARKS | RIVERS | LAKES | DRIVES | FORTS | MAPS

    Texas Attractions
    TEXAS FEATURES
    People | Ghosts | Historic Trees | Cemeteries | Small Town Sagas | WWII | History | Texas Centennial | Black History | Art | Music | Animals | Books | Food
    COLUMNS : History, Humor, Topical and Opinion

    TEXAS ARCHITECTURE | IMAGES
    Courthouses | Jails | Churches | Gas Stations | Schoolhouses | Bridges | Theaters | Monuments/Statues | Depots | Water Towers | Post Offices | Grain Elevators | Lodges | Museums | Rooms with a Past | Gargoyles | Cornerstones | Pitted Dates | Stores | Banks | Drive-by Architecture | Signs | Ghost Signs | Old Neon | Murals | Then & Now
    Vintage Photos

    TRAVEL RESERVATIONS | USA | MEXICO

    Privacy Statement | Disclaimer | Contributors | Staff | Contact TE
    Website Content Copyright ©1998-2011. Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC. All Rights Reserved