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 Texas : Towns A-Z / Hill Country : Leakey

LEAKEY, TEXAS

Real County Seat, Texas Hill Country
Highway 83, FM 337 and FM 336
On the Frio River
35 miles N of Uvalde
64 miles S of Junction
63 miles SW of Kerrville
84 miles SW of Fredericksburg
12 miles W of Vanderpool
90 miles NW of San Antonio
Population 387 (2000) 399 (1990)

Leakey, Texas Area Hotels:
Uvalde Hotels

1917 Real County courthouse, Leakey Texas
Photo courtesy Terry Jeanson, 2008
Real County courthouse

Leakey, Texas Topcs of Interest:

  • History in a Pecan Shell
  • Leakey Attractions & Nearby Destinations
  • Real County courthouse > next page
  • Leaky Cemetery > next page
  • The Canyon Theatre: Leakey's Last Picture Show > next page
  • The McLaurin Massacre > next page
  • History in a Pecan Shell

    The abundant water of the area drew many Indian tribes and the entire area was one of the last strongholds of Lipan Apaches and Comanches who were not happy about being displaced.

    After the arrival of the first Anglo-settlers the first industry established was the same as Bandera, Kerrville and other riverfront towns - shingle manufacturing.

    Shingle production and lumbering of the abundant Cypress trees was the major economic force until ranching and the raising of Angora goats replaced those activities. Tourism increased as roads improved.

    A timeline of significant events in Leakey

    1856: John and Nancy Leakey with a handfull of others settled near the site at springs that were to be named Leakey Springs.
    1883: The post office from the town of Floral moved to the settlement and opened in the Leakey store
    1884: Leakey became county seat of Edwards County and remained until 1891 when it moved to Rocksprings.
    1904: The population was just over 300 persons
    1913: Real County was organized and Leakey became the county seat. See Real County Courthouse
    1926: The population was only 150 people
    1951: Leakey gets around to incorporating
    1956: Leakey's population reaches its zenith of 762 people.
    Tombstone in Leakey Cemetery,  Texas
    Leaky Cemetery

    FM 337 as you enter Leakey from the East.

    It contains the graves of the town founders.

    It is perhaps a little ironic that the first interments in the cemetery were the last to be killed by Indians (in Real County).

    See Conflict on the Frio
    by Linda-Kirkpatrick
    The McLaurin Massacre
    McLaurin  massacre site , Leakey Texas
    Photo courtesy Linda Kirkpatrick
    The McLaurin Massacre
    Traveling Tent Show crossing river , old photo  1936
    Fording a low-water crossing in 1936
    Vintage photo courtesy Lloyd & Jackie Shultz
    Canyon Theatre Leakey Texas
    Photo courtesy Linda Kirkpatrick
    The Canyon Theatre:
    Leakey's Last Picture Show
    More Leakey Attractions & Nearby Destinations:
  • Real County Courthouse
  • Leaky Cemetery
  • Rio Frio, & Rio Frio Landmark Oak
    - A few miles south on FM 1120
  • Lost Maples State Natural Area
  • Garner State Park
  • Vanderpool, Texas

    Frio Canyon Chamber of Commerce
    P.O. Box 743 Leakey, TX 78873
    830-232-5222.

    Leakey, Texas Area Hotels:
    Uvalde Hotels | Kerrville Hotels | Junction Hotels
  • Leakey, Texas town square street scene
    A street on the courthouse square
    TE photo
    Historical Marker Text:
    Real County courthouse


    Leakey was the county seat of Edwards County from 1883 to 1891 when a vote moved the seat to Rocksprings. Real County, named for businessman and State Senator Julius Real, was organized from parts of Edwards, Kerr and Bandera counties in April 1913. Leakey was named the county seat and a temporary building was erected on the square. Controversy over the site of the county seat continued for several years, so Judge D. D. Thompson began planning for a permanent courthouse upon his election in 1917. Voters approved bonds to finance a permanent structure. The bonds were financed through Hanover National Bank of New York.

    Architect H. A. Reuter designed the 1918 courthouse, and the firm of McCreary and Schott served as contractors. According to oral history, a local builder known as "Scotty" Archibald made a significant contribution, as well. E. F. Vanderbilt was construction superintendent.

    Using native limestone quarried from Tucker Hollow near the site, workers erected Reuter's vision of a Classical Revival edifice with a fortress-like façade. The rusticated limestone bands were laid in regular courses with quicklime bonding to create the building's texture and solid feel. A stone pediment with simple cornice topped by a standing seam metal roof contributes to the building's character. Renovations and additions made in 1978 transformed the original doors into large central windows with flat arch and transoms. The fine structure retains its original flavor and distinctive features and remains the center of Real County government.

    Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 2000
    Leakey Texas Chronicles
  • The McLaurin Massacre
  • The Canyon Theatre: Leakey's Last Picture Show
  • Featured Column
    "Somewhere in the West"
    by Linda Kirkpatrick, Hometown Cowboy-Poet
    Leakey Texas Forum
  • Leakey founders
    I am one of many Leakeys in the UK, and stumbled upon your history of Leakey in Real County, Texas. I was interested to read that the founders, John and Nancy Leakey are interred in the Leakey cemetery and were the last to be killed by Red Indians in Real County. I wondered if you know anything about the origins of the founders. Do you know where they came from and can you direct me to any websites to help? - Chris Leakey, June 03, 2004
  • Leakey, Texas Area Destinations:
    Vanderpool
    Uvalde
    Junction
    Kerrville
    Fredericksburg
    San Antonio
    Where to Stay:
    Uvalde Hotels
    Kerrville Hotels
    Junction Hotels
    More Hotels
    More Texas Travel Destinations:
    Texas Hill Country
    Texas Towns
    Texas Ghost Towns
    Hotels
    Texas
    Hotels
    Uvalde Hotels
    Kerrville Hotels
    Junction Hotels
    Fredericksburg Hotels
    More Hotels
     
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