TexasEscapes.com Texas Escapes Online Magazine: Travel and History
Columns: History, Humor, Topical and Opinion
Over 1600 Texas Towns & Ghost Towns
NEW : : TEXAS TOWNS : : GHOST TOWNS : : FEATURES : : COLUMNS : : ARCHITECTURE : : IMAGES : : SITE MAP
HOME
SEARCH SITE
ARCHIVES
RESERVATIONS
Texas Hotels
Hotels
Cars
Air
Cruises
 
  Texas : Towns A-Z / West Texas : Crane

CRANE, TEXAS

Crane County Seat, West Texas
Hwys 385 and 329
32 miles South of Odessa
21 miles North of McCamey

Population: 3,191 (2000) 3,533 (1990)

Area Hotels - Book Here & Save
Odessa Hotels

Crane, Texas downtown street scene and watertower, 1940s
Crane street scene with watertower, 1940s
Photo courtesy texasoldphotos.com
 
Both county and city were named after Wm. Carey Crane who was a founder of the old Baylor University in Independence, Texas.

Crane County was formed in 1887 from land that had once been Tom Green County. The county was finally organized in 1927. In 1890 there were a reported 15 people who had coffee with the census enumerator.
Star and stipes and eagle mural




Patriotic mural in Crane

Photo courtesy James Rowland, 2004

History in a Pecan Shell

Even as Crane entered the 20th Century, the cattle and sheep outnumbered the people by a ratio of 420 to 1.

That meant 51 people and 21,400 animals in 1900.

They got a post office in 1908. By 1918 they started building roads and by 1920 there were only 37 people left in the county.

The oil boom changed that. The same regional boom that brought in the towns of Wink, McCamey, Iraan, and Notrees added an overnight population of thousands of land speculators, workers and camp followers. Mr. Ollin Columbus Kinnison* platted a townsite and named the streets after his children.

Crane County Courthouse - next page
The need for a courthouse was addressed in 1927 - the year the county was organized. Other city amenities came as the oil sold. At one point - water was so scarce that women sent their laundry to El Paso by train.

The population reached 1,400 in 1940. It should be remembered that 1941 was the year that Texas' rural population was outnumbered by its urban population. In Crane's case, the urban population always outnumbered the rural.

Oil continues to be Crane's main revenue source. Farming has never been big in Crane County and Cattle is a distant second source of revenue.

Book Your Hotel Here & Save
Odessa Hotels >
Crane High School, Crane, Texas






Crane High School

Photo courtesy James Rowland, 2004
Police station in Crane, Texas
Crane Police Station

Photo courtesy James Rowland, 2004
Crane, Texas city limit sign
Crane City Limit

Photo courtesy James Rowland

"Horsehead Crossing of the Pecos"

7 miles South of Crane on US 385 is a marker signifing the "Horsehead Crossing of the Pecos". Although the crossing could not be pin-pointed due to flooding and conditions, this is thought to be the vicinity.

The name stems from an abundance of horse and mule skulls found there. The animals died from drinking too much water too fast. The crossing wasn't used after the coming of the railroad, but before that it was the only logical low-water crossing for miles. It was a crossing for Indians, stagecoaches and cattleherds.

Book Your Hotel Here & Save
Odessa Hotels
Crane Texas street scene
A street scene of Crane
Photo Courtesy Charlene Beatty Beauchamp
Red fire truck
White fire truck
Fire trucks in Crane
Photos Courtesy Charlene Beatty Beauchamp

Crane Tourist Information

Crane Chamber of Commerce: 432-558-2311

Book Your Hotel Here & Save
Odessa Hotels
More Hotels
Crane Texas Forum
  • Remembering Crane - next page
  • Forwarding scan of a matchbook cover in my collection of Texas memorabilia. Does anyone remember Pat's Place, know when this business opened and closed, or have a photo? - Tom KC, April 14, 2006
  • Pat's Place Matchbook cover, Crane, Texas
    Matchbook cover. Drink Harry Mitchell's Lager Beer
     
    Anyone wishing to share history or photos of Crane, Texas, please contact us.
    John Troesser


    Book Your Hotel Here & Save
    Odessa Hotels
    More Hotels
    Texas Escapes
    Online Magazine

     
    TEXAS TOWN LIST | TEXAS GHOST TOWNS | TEXAS COUNTIES
    Texas Hill Country | East Texas | Central Texas North | Central Texas South |
    West Texas | Texas Panhandle | South Texas | Texas Gulf Coast
    TRIPS | STATES PARKS | RIVERS | LAKES | DRIVES | MAPS

    TEXAS FEATURES
    Ghosts | People | Historic Trees | Cemeteries | Small Town Sagas | WWII |
    History | Black History | Rooms with a Past | Music | Animals | Books | MEXICO
    COLUMNS : History, Humor, Topical and Opinion

    TEXAS ARCHITECTURE | IMAGES
    Courthouses | Jails | Churches | Gas Stations | Schoolhouses | Bridges | Theaters |
    Monuments/Statues | Depots | Water Towers | Post Offices | Grain Elevators |
    Lodges | Museums | Stores | Banks | Gargoyles | Corner Stones | Pitted Dates |
    Drive-by Architecture | Old Neon | Murals | Signs | Ghost Signs | Then and Now
    Vintage Photos

    TRAVEL RESERVATIONS | USA

    Privacy Statement | Disclaimer | Recommend Us
    Contributors | Staff | Contact TE
    TEXAS ESCAPES ONLINE MAGAZINE
    Website Content Copyright 1998-2007. Texas Escapes - Blueprints For Travel, LLC. All Rights Reserved
    This page last modified: July 2, 2007